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Published: November  19, 2014

Commander's Palace

Since 1880, Commander's Palace has been a New Orleans landmark known for the award-winning quality of its food and many commodious dining rooms. The history of this famous restaurant offers a glimpse into New Orleans' antebellum past. In the early 1880's, when Louisiana officially joined the nation, eager young Anglo-Saxons flocked to this promising territory to make their fortunes. Since the Vieux Carré was the stronghold of the proud Creoles, these "Americans" (as they were defined by the Creoles) sought a residential section of their own. Thus was born the Garden District, with its stately Greek Revival homes and quiet, tree lined streets.

Here in the Garden District George W. Cable entertained Mark Twain; here Jefferson Davis spent his last days. And here, in 1880, Emile Commander established the only restaurant patronized by the distinguished neighborhood families. He chose the corner of Washington Avenue and Coliseum Street, a site that had been in turn, part of the J.F.E. Livaudais Plantation and the faubourg of Lafayette. In 1854 it was engulfed by the city of New Orleans and by 1900 Commander's Palace was attracting gourmets from all over the world.

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Essentials


Address :

Commander's Palace 1403 Washington Ave New Orleans-Estados Unidos

Phone :

+1 504 8998221

Hours :

Monday-Sunday 11:30 AM–2:00 PM ,6:30 PM–10:00 PM

Payment Methods:

           

Published: November  19, 2014

Commander's Palace

Since 1880, Commander's Palace has been a New Orleans landmark known for the award-winning quality of its food and many commodious dining rooms. The history of this famous restaurant offers a glimpse into New Orleans' antebellum past. In the early 1880's, when Louisiana officially joined the nation, eager young Anglo-Saxons flocked to this promising territory to make their fortunes. Since the Vieux Carré was the stronghold of the proud Creoles, these "Americans" (as they were defined by the Creoles) sought a residential section of their own. Thus was born the Garden District, with its stately Greek Revival homes and quiet, tree lined streets.

Here in the Garden District George W. Cable entertained Mark Twain; here Jefferson Davis spent his last days. And here, in 1880, Emile Commander established the only restaurant patronized by the distinguished neighborhood families. He chose the corner of Washington Avenue and Coliseum Street, a site that had been in turn, part of the J.F.E. Livaudais Plantation and the faubourg of Lafayette. In 1854 it was engulfed by the city of New Orleans and by 1900 Commander's Palace was attracting gourmets from all over the world.