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These are the best cultural venues in town based on their, FACILITIES and ARTISTIC QUALITY.
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Published: September  29, 2014

Fori Imperiali

During Rome’s Republican Age, when Rome had become the capital of an empire that stretched from Gallia to Asia Minor, the city needed a bigger administration center than the Forum Romanum could offer and therefore extensions were needed. Julius Caesar was the first emperor to do this. Initially the new square he constructed in 54BC was simply thought of as an extension of the Roman Forum. After Julius Caesar the Forum of Augustus, the Forum Transitorius (which was built by Domitian but, since it was inaugurated by Nerva, is also known as Foro di Nerva) and the Forum of Trajan were constructed. These archeological areas together form a complex that nowadays is commonly known as the Imperial Fora (Fori Imperiali) and stretches from the Capitol Hill to the Quirinal Hill. It was not until public works were carried out in the area, as a result of the construction of the Via dei Fori Imperiali, (between 1924 and 1932) that the Imperial Fora were brought to light.

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Address :

Via dei Fori Imperiali | Via IV Novembre 6 00187 Rome, Italy


Schedule :

Tue - Sun: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm


Published: September  29, 2014

Fori Imperiali

During Rome’s Republican Age, when Rome had become the capital of an empire that stretched from Gallia to Asia Minor, the city needed a bigger administration center than the Forum Romanum could offer and therefore extensions were needed. Julius Caesar was the first emperor to do this. Initially the new square he constructed in 54BC was simply thought of as an extension of the Roman Forum. After Julius Caesar the Forum of Augustus, the Forum Transitorius (which was built by Domitian but, since it was inaugurated by Nerva, is also known as Foro di Nerva) and the Forum of Trajan were constructed. These archeological areas together form a complex that nowadays is commonly known as the Imperial Fora (Fori Imperiali) and stretches from the Capitol Hill to the Quirinal Hill. It was not until public works were carried out in the area, as a result of the construction of the Via dei Fori Imperiali, (between 1924 and 1932) that the Imperial Fora were brought to light.