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These are the best cultural venues in town based on their, FACILITIES and ARTISTIC QUALITY.
We reserve the rights of our selection panel to choose the appropriate establishments for our website.
Published: March  23, 2010

Tampa Museum of Art

The newest museum in the Tampa Bay area.
Since its inception, museum planners knew that the Tampa Museum of Art's original building was too small for its collection. Proposals for expansion or relocation were the subject of discussion and controversy for years. Several different plans were proposed either by the city of Tampa or the museum board, including: in 2001, architect Rafael Vinoly designed a dramatic $76 million building which would have included a huge metal canopy overhanging nearby city streets. The project proved too costly and perhaps unsafe in a hurricane. From 2003 to 2005, Tampa Mayor Pam Iorio proposed that the museum be relocated to one of several abandoned or underutilized buildings downtown, including an old federal courthouse and a small office tower. However, the museum board was unenthusiastic about the choices. As it turned out, converting the courthouse into usable museum space proved too expensive and disagreement over the appraised price of the office tower scrapped those plans as well. In 2006, the museum board and the city of Tampa agreed to use public and private funds to construct a $33 million, 66,000-square-foot (6,100 m2) new museum in redesigned Curtis Hixon Park as part of Mayor Iorio's Riverwalk project along the Hillsborough River. The building (by architect Stanley Saitowitz) is designed to look like "a metal box sitting on a glass pedestal" and makes use of aluminum, glass, and fiber optic color-changing lights in the exterior walls to "make the building itself a work of art".[4] New homes for the Tampa History Center and Tampa Children's Museum will also be built nearby. The former museum building had to be torn down to make way for the current one. In the interim, the Tampa Museum of Art was temporarily moved to the historic Centro Espanol building in West Tampa, which had been vacant for several years. Groundbreaking for the project took place on April 18, 2008, and the grand opening of the new Tampa Museum of Art took place on February 6, 2010.

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Address :

120 W. Gasparilla Plaza Tampa, FL 33602

Phone :

+1 813 2748130
Fax: +1 813 2748732
General Admission: adults $10; seniors $7.50, Florida educators $7.50, military plus one guest $7.50; students $5; and children ages 6 and under free A “pay what you will” fee structure will be offered every second Sat of the month from 9 a.m. – 11 a.m., and every Thurs from 5 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Hours :

Museum hours: Mon, Tues, Wed, and Fri from 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Thurs from 11 a.m. – 9 p.m. Sat and Sun from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.


Published: March  23, 2010

Tampa Museum of Art

The newest museum in the Tampa Bay area.
Since its inception, museum planners knew that the Tampa Museum of Art's original building was too small for its collection. Proposals for expansion or relocation were the subject of discussion and controversy for years. Several different plans were proposed either by the city of Tampa or the museum board, including: in 2001, architect Rafael Vinoly designed a dramatic $76 million building which would have included a huge metal canopy overhanging nearby city streets. The project proved too costly and perhaps unsafe in a hurricane. From 2003 to 2005, Tampa Mayor Pam Iorio proposed that the museum be relocated to one of several abandoned or underutilized buildings downtown, including an old federal courthouse and a small office tower. However, the museum board was unenthusiastic about the choices. As it turned out, converting the courthouse into usable museum space proved too expensive and disagreement over the appraised price of the office tower scrapped those plans as well. In 2006, the museum board and the city of Tampa agreed to use public and private funds to construct a $33 million, 66,000-square-foot (6,100 m2) new museum in redesigned Curtis Hixon Park as part of Mayor Iorio's Riverwalk project along the Hillsborough River. The building (by architect Stanley Saitowitz) is designed to look like "a metal box sitting on a glass pedestal" and makes use of aluminum, glass, and fiber optic color-changing lights in the exterior walls to "make the building itself a work of art".[4] New homes for the Tampa History Center and Tampa Children's Museum will also be built nearby. The former museum building had to be torn down to make way for the current one. In the interim, the Tampa Museum of Art was temporarily moved to the historic Centro Espanol building in West Tampa, which had been vacant for several years. Groundbreaking for the project took place on April 18, 2008, and the grand opening of the new Tampa Museum of Art took place on February 6, 2010.